Doctors Speak Out Against Their Gruelling Work Hours By Sharing Asleep At Work Photos

Earlier this month, a blog was posted with this photo, criticising young doctors who fall asleep on the job. It’s sparked a worldwide social media movement defending doctor’s need to rest.

“We are aware that this is a tiring job but doctors are obliged to do their work,” the blogger wrote. “There are dozens of patients in need of attention.”

Mexican doctor Juan Carlos got wind of this post, and defended the young doctor, taking to Twitter with the hashtag #YoTambienMeDormi, which translates to “I’ve also fallen asleep.” With that hashtag, he inadvertently sparked a movement.

“I’ve also fallen asleep after operating on one, two, three and even four patients on any regular shift,” it says.

Doctors from all around the world started posting photos of themselves sleeping, and speaking out about their experiences.

“IAlsoFellAsleep after a 24-hour shift as a medical student.”

In Latin America, young doctors often work up to 36 hours with little or no breaks.

“36 hours working nonstop is impossible without 10 minutes of rest.”

 

Doctors are arguing that falling asleep at work doesn’t mean you’re a bad doctor.

 

The hashtag has been used over 14,000 times, and is being spread all around the world.

 

In the USA, new rules brought in in 2011 stated that no medical student could work more than 16 hours in a row, and that resident physicians can’t work for more than 28 hours.

“#IAlsoFellAsleep because the journey is long. Patients understand your doctors, they put a lot of effort every day to help you.”

 

Medical students make huge sacrifices for their training, like going for long periods of time without food or sleep.

“#IAlsoFellAsleep 36-hour shifts, preparing for exams, no time to eat.”

 

Mexican doctor Marcela Cueva wants to point out that doctors should be treated as normal humans with the same “physiological needs” as everyone else.

“It is shameful the conditions doctors around the world have to work in.”
“We are people, not machines.”